Filler/Dysport Event

What are Fillers?
Injectable wrinkle fillers can give you a more youthful look for a fraction of what a traditional facelift costs. Most will fill lines and wrinkles in less than 30 minutes with results that can last from 4 months to more than a year. Injectable wrinkle fillers, unlike Botox injections that relax the muscle under a wrinkle, fill the line, crease, or area with one of several different substances. As a result, trouble spots nearly disappear.

Wrinkle fillers can also be used as “volumizers,” plumping and lifting cheeks, jawlines, and temples; filling out thin lips, and plumping sagging hands. The treatment is fast and easy. But all wrinkle fillers have a downside, including the risk of allergic reaction and the formation of tiny bumps under the skin. In some cases, those bumps may be permanent. And sometimes, a bluish skin discoloration known as the Tyndall effect happens. The color change can last for several months, but there are treatments available. In very rare cases, skin cells may die if the wrinkle fillers are not used properly. There have also been a few reported cases of blindness and nerve paralysis. Typically, the wrinkle fillers that last longer are the ones more likely to cause side effects.

Not every wrinkle-filler is right for every type of wrinkle. The least risks and best results come from using the right one correctly. That’s why you should only have fillers injected by a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon with ongoing, special training.

What Is Dysport?
This injectable treatment for wrinkles is made from the same neurotoxin (botulinum toxin type A) as Botox. Dysport (formally Reloxin) received the approval of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use as a wrinkle treatment in the spring of 2009, but it has been smoothing out facial folds and lines in Europe, South America, and elsewhere for several years. Like Botox, this injectable was originally developed in the 1990s to treat neuromuscular disorders.

Dysport is similar to Botox, although some research suggests that Dysport may be faster-acting and longer-lasting. It also spreads farther from the injection site, thus allowing a broader area of small wrinkles (such as the “crow’s feet” lines that splay out from the corners of the eyes) to be treated with fewer injections. This latter feature has a disadvantage, however. Unless skillfully applied, Dysport may spread to muscles, such as those in the upper eyelids, that you don’t want relaxed. That’s why it’s essential that you receive these treatments from an experienced physician.

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